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Posted on Monday, March 28, 2005

28 March 2005, Monday AFternoon Classics with Gandalf, Monday, Noon to 2:00PM, streaming online at www.wjffradio.org
Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf
Monday, 28 March 2005
050328

You can listen to an audio archive of this program:
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Good Afternoon, Lovers of Fine Music, and welcome to Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, where we will hear the best of 20th and 21st century classical music as well as interviews with occasional guests. Before we begin our program, let’s hear what Liberty Green has to tell us on her weekly Arts and Culture Calendar.
As always, Liberty, we all thank you for the time and effort you have put into producing the WJFF Arts and Culture calendar.


1. We are very fortunate to have as our guests today not one, but two extremely interesting music personalities, Lucius Weathersby, composer, pianist, and organist; and Alberto Patron, composer of a kind of contemporary "classical" music he has named "Aporetic" music, which we will discuss during the course of our visit by phone. Amazingly enough, given my own cyber-ineptness, but thanks to the help of our wonderful John Bachman, Kurt Knuth, and Christine Ahern, we are able to bring our listeners both individuals at the same time. Even more amazing, they will be able to hear and talk with each other as well as with your host. I don’t expect to get away with much today!

2. Luke and Alberto are connected to one another because they have recorded twelve pieces by Alberto Patron with Luke at the piano on a CD entitled My journey to the Aporetic Music. In addition, Luke has also recorded two other pieces by Alberto, Toccata and Gnomus, which he performed as part of a recital at St. Matthew United Church of Christ in New Orleans, Louisiana, in September, 1999. Neither of these CDs is available at this moment for commercial distribution, but both Alberto and Lucius are working on it.
3. Professor Alberto Patron: Welcome to WJFF’s Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf. It is a great
pleasure to be visiting with you in Pordenone, Italy, today.

(Alberto: HI GANDALF, HI LUCIUS, AND GOOD AFTERNOON TO ALL YOUR AUDIENCE, THANKS TO INVITE ME AS GUEST COMPOSER IN YOUR INTERESTING AFTERNOON CLASSICS RADIO BROADCAST, YES I'M SPEAKING FROM ITALY, I'M NEAR VENICE NOW)

4. Professor Lucius Weathersby: Welcome to our program today. I hope the weather in New Orleans is warmer than it is here!

(Luke: Say something here.)

5. Let’s start by finding out how the two of you managed to get together to produce the recordings that we are going to broadcast during our program this afternoon. Luke, let’s begin with you. How and when did you meet Alberto, and what led you two to record your performances of his music?

(Luke: Please respond)

Alberto, let’s hear your side of things for a few moments. Do you have anything to
add to what Lucius has just said about how you two got together to collaborate in recording these CDs?
(Alberto: WELL, I CAN SAY THAT LUCIUS WEATHERSBY REALLY DID A GREAT JOB WITH THIS PIANO PERFORMANCE, HE WAS ABLE TO TRANSFUSE IN HIS PIANO PERFORMANCE THE RIGHT EXPRESSIVE INTENSITY AND DEEP FEELING THAT THESE MUSIC PIECES REQUIRE. THESE COMPOSITIONS ARE NOT JUST MUSIC, BUT THEY ARE A SORT OF WAY TOWARD AN APPROACH TO THE MOST PERSONAL SIDE OF EACH OF US, AN APPROACH TO OUR DEEP SOUL, THIS'S WHY THIS MUSIC WAS CALLED ALSO AS AID-MUSIC, AND USED IN MUSIC THERAPY AND MEDICAL PURPOSES. THIS'S WHY I SAID LUCIUS IS A GREAT MUSICIAN, 'CAUSE INSTEAD OF OTHER PREVIOUS PERFORMERS HE DOES NOT ONLY PERFORMED MUSIC, BUT EXPRESSES SOMETHING MORE, A SUBTILE FEELING THAT DISTINGUISHES ART FROM THAT CONTEMPORARY ANNOYANCE THAT MANY PEOPLE KNOWS)

Alberto, please tell us something about your background. Where did you grow up?

(Alberto: WELL, I TOOK MY PH.Ds AT THE MUSIC CONSERVATORY OF VENICE, AND AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PADUA. THEN I WENT TO IMPROVE MY STUDIES AT SEVERAL BIG EUROPEAN MUSIC ACADEMIES AND RESEARCH CENTERS, WHERE I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO MEET BIG COMPOSERS LIKE NOEL LEE, BERIO, MADERNA, AND OTHER ARTISTS, WHO OPENED MY MIND TO NEW EXCITING MUSIC EXPERIMENTATIONS AND RESEARCHES, NOT ONLY WITH THE EUROPEAN CULTURE BUT ALSO WITH THE AMERICAN ONE, FOR THE JAZZ MUSIC I REMEMBER NOW MY BIG PROFESSOR WALTER NORRIS, HE WAS THE ACCOMPANIST OF STAN GETZ, HE PLAYED WITH MEL LEWIS AND JOHNNY GRIFFIN. SO I GREW UP WITH THESE ARTISTS LETTING ME TO BREATHE INTERNATIONAL CULTURE. THEN AFTER THESE EXPERIENCES I STARTED TEACHING AT UNIVERSITIES, TO GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS (FROM NEW ORLEAN UNIVERSITY TO CINCINNATI, TO NEW YORK, ETC.), AND WRITE MUSIC FOR WORLD ORCHESTRAS, SOLOISTS AND ENSEMBLES. WIN MUSIC COMPETITIONS AND SO ON)

Alberto, when did you begin to study music seriously, and when did you realize that
you were going to devote yourself to composition?

(Alberto: OH, I STARTED MY FIRST PIANO LESSONS AT THE AGE OF 5 YEARS, IT WAS FOR ME LIKE A GAME, ALSO IF I DID MY FIRST PIANO CONCERT AT THE AGE OF SEVEN..., I THINK IT'S STILL A GAME FOR ME, I DO NOT PLAY MUSIC FOR MONEY, THIS'S WHY I CAN WRITE WITHOUT ANY KIND OF PRESSURE, YES I DO IT SERIOUSLY, BUT EVERYTIME I START A NEW COMPOSITION IT'S LIKE THE FIRST TIME FOR ME, AND THIS IS WHAT I'M USE TO TAUGHT TO MY STUDENTS, THIS IS THE ONLY WAY TO ENJOY THE MUSIC PROFESSION)

10. Lucius Weathersby, your turn: Where are you from? Where did you study, and how did you become involved in music?

(Luke: reply)

Luke, in addition to composing, you are also an accomplished pianist and organist. Tell us something about the performance part of your life.

(Luke: reply)

11. Luke, after we listen to your performance of some of Alberto’s music, we’ll hear some of yours. First, however, let’s find out from Alberto what the "Aporetic trope" cycle we are going to broadcast is all about.
12. Alberto, let’s talk about what you have set out to accomplish here. You indicate that your purpose in writing "Aporetic" music is to "carry out philosophical thought." (liner notes, My Journey to the Aporetic Music) You write, "My greatest joy is to give the people something that they will remember and something which they can use to grow. Great music and philosophies afford people the opportunity to stretch their minds and their souls. Exactly what do you mean by all this when it comes to the music you have composed? (What is "Aporetic music and how do you create it in your works?)

(Alberto: WELL, APORETIC MUSIC AND MORE THE APORETIC THOUGHT, FINDS HIS ROOTS IN MY STUDIES ON THE ANCIENT GREEK PHILOSOPHIES. WHEN I WAS IN ATHENS RESEARCHING ON THE ROOTS OF THE MUSIC, I FOUND THE FIRST PHILOSOPHER WHO APPLIED PHILOSOPHICAL CONCEPTS TO THE MUSIC IDEA. HE WAS THE KNOWN ENESIDÉMUS OF CNÒSSUS (DIED IN 40 BEFORE CHRIST), DISCIPLE OF THE GREAT PHYRRUS OF ÈLIS, A SCEPTICAL PHILOSOPHER. SOME YEARS AFTER MY GREEK STUDIES I MET PAUL DAVIES, THE KNOWN SCIENTIST OF THE SUPERSTRING THEORY OF THE UNIVERSE, WELL MY PHILOSOPHICAL THOUGHT ON THE ABSOLUTE MUSIC BECOME REAL, I DON'T WANT TO TELL HERE ABOUT THE COMPLEX MATHEMATICAL AND MUSICAL CONCEPTS THAT TAKE ME TO THIS NEW PHILOSOPHY, IT'S SOMETHING TOO LONG, BUT I WANT TO SAY, WHAT CAME OUT WAS A NEW WAY TO WRITE MUSIC, CLOSER TO OUR SOUL, SOMETHING YOU CAN IMMEDIATELY FEEL, AND OF COURSE YOU CAN REMEMBER FOR LONG TIME (INSTEAD OF THE USUAL MUSIC); SOME OF MY MUSICAL COMPOSITIONS, FOR THESE MATTERS, WERE USED ALSO BY MEDICAL DOCTORS FOR ANAMNESTIC DIAGNOSIS OF PATIENTS' PERCEPTION. WELL, MY MUSIC IS OF COURSE NOT WRITTEN THINKING ONLY THE MUSIC THERAPY, BUT REALLY IT WORKS VERY WELL FOR THESE MATTERS 'CAUSE WAS WRITTEN WITH THIS NEW METHOD - CALLED APORETIC -, OF COURSE DURING THE CONCERTS PEOPLE ARE VERY HAPPY AND ENJOY THE CONCERTS IN A NEW WAY.

11. Luke, you’ve no doubt discussed this with Alberto many times. What is it about his music that you find attractive enough to perform and record?

(Luke: reply)


Alberto and Lucius, we’re going to broadcast all nine Aporetic tropes from My Journey to the Aporetic Music CD. I had thought of breaking them up into several sections, but the more I listen to them the more I realize they belong together. They take about 44 minutes to play, so we will introduce them and continue our discussion after they are over. (This means that I will call you each again about 5 minutes before the music ends. Try not to be on the phone!)

13. Alberto: Any advice for the listeners as we play these pieces? What might they be listening for?
(Alberto: RIGHT GANDALF, THE APORETIC PIANO TROPES ARE TEN BUT HERE YOU WILL LISTEN ONLY NINE PIECES 'CAUSE THE SIXTH TROPE WASN'T RECORDED, THE SIXTH TROPE IS THE COPY OF THE FIRST TROPE BUT PERFORMED BACKWARD. WELL I ADVICE THE LISTENERS WHO HAVE A GOOD AUDIO EQUIPMENT TO RELAX, SIT DOWN IN A COMFORTABLE ARMCHAIR AND THINK ABOUT THEMSELVES, THEY WILL DISCOVER SOMETHING STRANGE BUT VERY NICE, THEY WILL REMEMBER AND NEED IT AGAIN, THE TEN TROPES ARE LIKE A STAIRCASE, CROSSING EVERY STEP WILL BRING YOU TO A SUPERIOR NEW FLOOR, OF COURSE FOR THOSE PEOPLE WHO ARE WORKING AND JUST SPEED LISTENING, THEY COULD ONLY APPRECIATE A NEW MUSIC.)

14. Luke: What do you want to communicate to the listener when you play these pieces?
(Luke: reply)


CD 1: Bands 1-9 Alberto Patron (PORDENONE-ITALY, 1969): Lucius Weathersby, piano; Valentino Dentesani, violin; Chiara Urli, ‘cello.

Time: 1. No 1. 02’44
2. No 2. 04’12
3. No 3. 02’25
4. No 4. 05’06
5. No 5. 04’49
6. No 6. 07’18
7. No 7. 09’14
8. No 8. 06’16
9. No 9. 02’06

Total time: 44’04

15. We have just heard Alberto Patron’s 9 Aporetic tropes performed by Lucius Weathersby on the piano, Valentino Dentesany, on the violin; and Chiara Urli, playing the ‘cello.
Alberto: Daniele Bergesio mentions in his liner notes that there are 10 Aporetic tropes; there appear to be only 9 on the CD. Can you clear up that mystery for me?

(Alberto: YES GANDALF, AS I TOLD THE SIXTH APORETIC TROPE WASN'T RECORDED 'CAUSE IS JUST THE BACKWARD PERFORMANCE OF THE FIRST TROPE, AND DOES NOT ADD OR REMOVE ANYTHING TO THE LISTENING, SO WE DECIDED TO PERFORM IT ONLY IN LIVE CONCERTS, WHERE ALSO THE THEATRICAL MOTION IS IMPORTANT, AND IN THE RECORDING YOU CANNOT CATCH IT)

17. What fascinates me about this music is its apparent references to Schoenberg, Cage, as well as Chinese music: Bergesio mentions Wu Dao-Gong and his hexagram musical system. Alberto, you seem to succeed quite nicely in constructing a music cycle that reflects on these and other composers. You achieve a sound that is clean, clear, and yet somehow also quite lush. There are times when your rhythms remind me a bit of Satie, although that may be just my wild imagination running away from me! Very satisfying music, Alberto!

(Alberto: GANDALF YOU ARE TOO KIND, I HOPE YOUR AUDIENCE HAVE ENJOYED THIS MUSIC TIME, AUDIENCE COMES ALWAYS FIRST FOR ME AND MY MUSIC .

18. Luke, it is no surprise to me that your piano playing is beautifully suited to the music. You really do play the music, a feat not every pianist accomplishes!

(Luke: reply)

A reminder that our guests today on Monday Afternoon classics with Gandalf are composers Alberto Patron and composer and performer Lucius Weathersby. Both gentlemen are also professors and Ph.D.s
You are tuned to WJFF, 90.5 fm in Jeffersonville, NY, and 94.5fm in Monticello, NY, streaming online at wjffradio.org.

19. Luke, it’s time for us to listen to some of your music, which, fortuitously, you have provided for us on your Albany CD Spiritual Fantasy. This CD contains works by Fela Sowande, William Grant Still, Kevin George, Wallace Cheatham, and yourself. I imagine, from the liner notes and the fact that it is all organ music, that part of the joy of recording these pieces was the opportunity for you to play the 1864 "Father" Willis Organ. Tell us something about that instrument, please.

(Luke: reply)

20. Alberto: Are you familiar with this CD by Lucius Weathersby? Do you have any comments to make about the two pieces we area about to hear, "Spiritual Fantasy" and "The Martyrs of Torrington, 1646?"

(Alberto: YES I KNOW THIS RECORDING, I LISTENED IT THE SAME DAY THE CD WAS PUBLISHED BY ALBANY RECORDS. THE SPIRITUAL FANTASY OF DR. WEATHERSBY WAS PREMIERED BY THE COMPOSER ON JANUARY 1997 AT THE MEYERSON CENTER OF THE PERFORMING ARTS, IS A VERY CHALLENGING WORK THAT CALLS FOR VERY IMAGINATIVE USE OF AFRICAN/AFRICAN AMERICAN ENBELLISHMENTS AND HARMONIC BASES, VERY INTERESTING AND WELL COMPOSED. ABOUT THE MARTYRS OF TORRINGTON IS A BEAUTIFUL PIECE INSPIRED BY THE HISTORY OF THE CHURCH IN WHICH THIS RECORDING WAS MADE, ON FEBRUARY 1646, WHERE DURING THE ENGLISH CIVIL WAR THE TOWN WAS TAKEN OVER BY THE PARLIAMENTARY NEW MODEL ARMY LED BY SIR THOMAS FAIRFAX AND OLIVER CROMWELL. THE CHURCH WAS BLOWN UP AND AROUND 200 ROYALISTS INSIDE PERISHED. THIS WORK IS IN MEMORIAM TO THOSE PEOPLE.)

Lucius, would you reveal something about the origins of these pieces?

CD 2: Bands 8, 10: Lucius Weathersby (1968, Houston): "Spiritual Fantasy" and "The Martyrs of Torrington." Lucius Weathersby, organ. Spiritual Fantasy. Albany Records, http://www.albanyrecords.com/ Troy 440.
22. We have just heard Lucius Weathersby’s "Spiritual Fantasy" and "The Martyrs of Torrington" performed by the composer.

Time: 8. Spiritual Fantasy 04’16
10. The Martyrs of Torrington, 1646 06’31
Total time: 10’47

Running time of music: 54’51

23. Luke, your talents are wondrous. Between Luke and Alberto, I feel particularly favored today!

24. Alberto Patron: we have time for one more selection of your music. I thought we might broadcast your "Gnomus (Wennish Ghiyaa)" performed by Lucius Weathersby on the pipe organ and recorded on a private CD. Because there are no liner notes with this CD, I’m hoping that you will provide some information about the piece. First, what does the title "Gnomus (Wennish Ghiyaa) mean?

(Alberto: WELL, THIS COMPOSITION WAS WRITTEN UPON AN ANCIENT NORTHERN FABLE. WENNISH GHIYAA WAS A SMALL SPITEFUL GNOME, WHO WENT OUT AT NIGHT FROM HIS DEN, CUNNINGLY SKIPPING ABOUT AND TRYING TO MAKE FUN MAGICS ON THE INHABITANTS OF A SMALL VILLAGE. YOU CAN HEAR ALL THESE EFFECTS IN THE POWERFUL PIPE ORGAN PERFORMANCE OF DR. WEATHERSBY.)

Luke, weigh in on this piece. What do you have to say about it?

CD 3: Band 9: Gnomus 11’34

Total running time of music: 66’25

We have just heard "Gnomus" composed by one of our guests today, Alberto Patron and performed on a pipe organ by our other guest, Lucius Weathersby. The piece was recorded on a private label.

27. Well, Alberto Patron and Lucius Weathersby, the music we have heard today is, in my opinion, both interesting and quite enchanting. I am certainly pleased that we’ve been able to hook up with both of you, and I look forward to more visits. Alberto, the next time you are in the United States, you are invited to visit us in Jeffersonville, NY. Luke, we’ll have to hog tie you and bring you up here from New Orleans. You and I are engaged in musical matters that will, I trust, bring us together quite frequently.

28. Alberto Patron, thank you so very much for taking the time to be with us today. I know that I enjoyed listening to you talk about yourself and your music very much; I hope our listeners did, also. We all wish you the very best in the future and look forward to hearing from you again soon.

(Alberto: THANKS TO YOU GANDALF AND TO YOUR RADIO, HUGS TO LUCIUS, AND A STRONG EMBRACE TO ALL THE LISTENERS, HEAR YOU SOON; AND REMEMBER TO MAKE A VISIT TO THE APORETIC WORLD FOUNDATION WEBSITE AT: http://www.aporeticworld.com/ BYE BYE. )

29. Lucius Weathersby, thank you for making time for us today. I know that your schedule keeps you running all the time, and I appreciate your setting aside some time for us. We wish you the very best and look forward to seeing you soon.

(Luke: reply)

We have come to the end of another Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf. Our guests on today’s program have been composer and professor, Dr. Alberto Patron, who spoke with us from VENICE, Italy; and composer, pianist, organist, and professor, Dr. Lucius Weathersby, who joined us from New Orleans. Alberto and Luke! Ciao! Buona fortuna a TUTTI !

We have heard Alberto Patron’s My Journey to the Aporetic Music as well as his piece for pipe organ, Gnomus. We’ve also heard two pieces by Lucius Weathersby: "Spiritual Fantasy" and "The Martyrs of Torrington, 1646." I sincerely hope that you have enjoyed today’s program and that you will tune in next week for more great 20th and 21st century "classical" music and beyond. Until then, this is Gandalf thanking you for listening and wishing you all the best of New Music!

Professor Alberto Patron, Ph.D.




Professor Lucius Weathersby, Ph.D.
:: :: ::

Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005

21 March 2005, Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, Monday, Noon to 2:00PM, streaming online at www.wjffradio.org
Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf
Monday, 21 March 2005
050321

Good Afternoon, Lovers of Fine Music, and welcome to Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, where we will hear the best of 20th and 21st century classical music as well as interviews with occasional guests. Before we begin our program, let’s hear what Liberty Green has to tell us on her weekly Arts and Culture Calendar.

As always, Liberty, we all thank you for the time and effort you have put into producing the WJFF Arts and Culture calendar.

Before beginning today’s program, I wish to express my sincere thanks to Uncle Bill, who so generously filled in for my while I was away for the past month. Uncle Bill’s willingness to pinch hit for me makes it possible for me to take the occasional vacation with an easy mind, and I am deeply grateful to him for it.

1. We are very fortunate to have as our guest for part of today’s program Professor Richard Brooks, chairman emeritus of the Department of Music at Nassau Community College in Garden City, Long Island http://www.go-qca.com/news_htm/i8p2.html. Professor Brooks’s new opera, Robert and Hal, was presented in a workshop performance in the city last October by Nancy Bogen and The Lark Ascending, at St. Paul’s German Lutheran Evangelical Church, w. 23rd St.. Professor Brooks will be the guest speaker at the Andes, NY, Round Table this Wednesday night at 7:00PM. If you’ve never attended one of these splendid sessions, this is an auspicious time to participate in one of the truly fine weekly cultural events that takes place in our area. The Round Table meets at the Hunting Tavern in Andes every Wednesday at 7:00PM. For driving directions, please call me after the program today.
2. Professor Brooks, welcome to Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf. Thanks for taking the time to be with us today!
3. Unfortunately, I did not know that you would be available to visit with us today until it was too late for me to get hold of any of your recorded works. As a result, we’ll have to content ourselves with talking about your career in general and your opera Robert and Hal in particular for part of today’s program. I hope that you will be able to visit us again at a later date so that we can provide our listeners with a sampling of your music.
4. Richard, tell us something about your life and your career, please. Where are you from?
Where did you go to school?
6. When did you become interested in music and what influenced you to make it your life’s work?
7. I understand that you [were the chairman of the music department at Nassau Community College. I’m interested in the kind of program you were able to develop for community college students. What have been your chief goals, and how have you gone about realizing them?
What courses do you teach?
What do you expect of your students?
Talk to us about your composing. Do you concentrate on any particular musical
forms, or do you find yourself working in many of them?
Let’s get on to your opera, whose theme is certainly contemporary. What is Robert
and Hal all about?
12. Does the opera have a story line? If so, what is it? That is, do you concentrate on specific incidents in the characters’ lives?
What about the music itself? How would you describe it?
13. I believe that Robert and Hal had what is called a "workshop" performance in the city last October. Please fill us in on some of the details of this – where did the performance take place, etc.
14. What was it like for you to participate in and witness a performance of your opera? Were you pleased with your work? Did you make any changes as a result of viewing it?
15. You are scheduled to discuss Robert and Hal this Wednesday, March 23rd, at the Andes Round Table at 7:00PM at the Hunting Tavern in Andes, NY. Will we get to hear any of the music?
16. Richard, as I mentioned at the beginning of our visit, unfortunately, I have none of your music in my possession, so we’ll have to wait for another time to share it with our listeners. Nevertheless, the Andes Round Table is a weekly forum that is always open to interested visitors, and our listeners are cordially invited to attend your lecture. Before we say farewell, is there anything else that you want to mention?
17. Richard, thanks for taking the time to visit with us today. Our good wishes go with you as you continue your career as a composer! See you Wednesday night!
18. Our guest today has been Professor Richard Brooks, Chairman of the Music Department at Nassau Community College in Long Island. Professor Brooks will address the Andes Round Table this Wednesday at the Andes Hunting Tavern in Andes, NY, at 7:00PM. If you are interested in attending and need directions, please call me at 482-4141 between 2:00PM and 3:00PM today.

CD1: Franghiz Ali-Zadeh http://www.classical-composers.org/cgi-bin/ccd.cgi?comp=ali-zadeh (*1947, Baku, Azerbaijan): Apsheron Quintet (2001): Kronos Quartet: David Harrington and John Sherba, violins; Hank Dutt, viola; Jennifer Culp, ‘cello; Franghiz Ali-Zadeh, piano http://www.kronosquartet.com/ . Nonesuch 79804-2 http://www.nonesuch.com/.

Several weeks ago, I broadcast a piece called Oasis, which was composed by Franghiz Ali-Zadeh and recorded by the redoubtable Kronos Quartet. Franghiz Ali-Zadeh, you may recall, is from Azerbaijan, a country many of us know too little about, but which Greg Dubinsky describes in his liner notes as "a point of transition between worlds, . . . a land where differences co-exist." (Liner notes, unnumbered). It is also, as a matter of interest, the birthplace of Mstislav Rostropovich, a fact which, in my opinion, alone makes it an important place musically.
Dubinsky continues: Ali-Zadeh’s most recent work for Kronos, the Apsheron Quintet (2001), was . . . conceived at a resort on the dry Apsheron peninsula near the Azerbaijani capital of Baku. [The composer] recalls the images that made the greatest impression on her: ‘All colors shine especially brightly: the red sun, the blue Caspian, the yellow sand. The wind carries the acrid smell of a wave from the sea to the shore, in which one can discern oil as well as salt/ Dark purple grapes tremble in the wind, rouge pomegranates scintillate in their glow, the amber-colored fig is filled with juicy sweetness.’ A spiraling melody in the violin, buried deep in the contrapuntal waves of the other instruments, emerges like the morning sun out of the sea. Midway through the movement, the same melody breaks through in the upper register amid the quiet rustling of strings and the occasional pianistic zephyr. It is heard again in faint echo at the close, as light audibly fades. disarmingly, the movement ends with a quick shrug of the shoulders, an urbane expression of delight in the spectacle it has just witnessed.
"The Quintet’s mystical close, "Reverse Time," recreates Bartókian night music in the Azerbaijani countryside . . . creating a surreal halo of otherworldly sounds. . . . [t]he wonder and terror of the nocturnal landscape . . . [is replaced by] the placid calm of the night sky return[ing,] and the solitary call of a distant bird reminds us perhaps of a world beyond this one."

Time: I. Tactile Time 11’27
II. Reverse Time 07’24

Total time: 18’58

CD 2: Bands 4,5,6: Quincy Porter (1897, New Haven, CT – 1966, Bethany, CT) http://www.newmusicbox.org/first-person/nov99/quincyporter.html: Sonata No. 2 for Piano and Violin (1929): Louis Kaufman, violin; Artur Balsam, piano. 20th Century Violin Works in Historic Recordings. Music and Arts CD 638.
(William) Quincy Porter, according to the liner notes, was a "descendant of early American Pioneers [who] was born in New Haven, CT [where] both his father and grandfather were professors at Yale University." Porter studied with Ernest Bloch and later became the director of the New England Conservatory of Music. He dedicated his second sonata for violin and piano, a piece in three movements, to his wife. Henry Roth comments in his liner notes that the piece expresses [Porter’s] dramatic lyricism, rhythmic vitality, and poetic sentiment." We hear it performed by violinist Louis Kaufman and pianist Artur Balsam.

Time: 4. Allegro 05’25
5. Andante 05’50
6. Allegro con fuoco 04’21

Total time: 15’43

Running time: 34’41

CD 3: Bands 1,2,3,4: Paul Hindemith (1895, Hanau, German – 1963, Frankfurt am Main) http://w3.rz-berlin.mpg.de/cmp/hindemith.html : Kleine Kammermusik für 5 Bläser, Op. 24, No. 2 (1922) (Little Chamber Music for 5 Wind Instruments): The Aulos Wind Quintet: Peter Rijks, flute; Diethelm Jonas, oboe; Karl-Theo Adler, clarinet; Dietmar Ullrich, horn; Ralph Sabow, bassoon. Aulos Bläser Quintet Vol. 7 Hindemith, Eisler, Schönberg: Koch/Schwann CD 3-1163-2 H1.

Here is an absolutely gorgeous piece by a composer whom we haven’t heard much of lately – perhaps he’s fallen out of fashion, who knows! – Paul Hindemith’s Little Chamber Music for 5 Wind Instruments. Hans-Peter Jahn (transl. by Celia Skrine) tells us that Hindemith wrote this piece in 1922 as part of his 7 chamber music pieces. The notorious philosopher/ music critic Theodor Adorno, who attended the premiere in 1923, argues that Hindemith did not compose music that was self-satisfied in its completeness, but that he wrote music that "ensures that one work acts as a corrective to another where necessary." Adorno wrote this admiringly and contrasted Hindemith with Busoni, "whose weighty posturings remain lightweight." Not a good idea to get on the wrong side of Adorno!
We hear Hindemith’s 5 movement wind quintet performed by the Aulos Wind Quintet, which also premiered works dedicated to them by Isang Yun, among others.

Time: 1. Lustig 02’43
2. Walzer 01’54
3. Ruhig und einfach 04’29
Schnelle Viertel
Sehr lebhaft 03’42

Total time: 12’48

Running time: 47’29

CD 4: Band 1: Erik Satie (1866, Honfleur – 1925, Paris): Sports et Divertissements (1913/14) http://www.af.lu.se/~fogwall/satie.html . Joao Paulo Santos, piano. Erik Satie – Pianoworks. Digital Concerto CCT 747.

There is so much about the piano music of Erik Satie that seems to me both post-modern and pre-20th century. That he was an enigma in is own time is taken for granted. Fritz de Haen writes in his liner notes, "A Genius or a joker? That is the question one tends to ask when Erik Satie is discussed. One biographer called him "the strangest musician of our times." (Liner notes) Well, perhaps his contemporaries were more easily shocked than we are – or perhaps they were just less blasé. Who can say? I will tell you this: When he is on, Satie grabs me by the throat and punches me in the heart while tickling me almost beyond bearing. Let’s hear Joao Paulo Santos play his 1913/4 piece Sports et Divertissements. No one else, I think, can have such fun in minor keys.

Time: 1. Sports et divertissements 13’30

Running time: 60’59

CD 5: Bands 14, 15, 16: Halsey Stevens (1908, Scott, NY – 1989, Long Beach, CA) http://www.halseystevens.com/ : Sonata for Trumpet and Piano (1956): Jouko Harjanne, trumpet; Juhani Lagerspetz, piano. American Trumpet Sonatas: Finlandia CD 0630-17691-2.

Anttii Pajamo (Transl. by Jaako Mäntyjärvi) writes in the liner notes that Halsey Stevens, whose Sonata for Trumpet and Piano will close our program today, has been called " . . . the Hindemith of America" because he composed a large number of sonatas and because of his choice of instruments. Pajamo, however, argues that "he was much more akin to Bartók." The liner notes quote an anonymous source who claims that his (her?) "American colleagues . . . thought the best trumpet sonatas written in America were Halsey Stevens’s work." We’ll hear Jouko Harjanne play the trumpet and Juhani Lagerspetz play the piano on this Finlandia CD.

Time: 14. Allegro moderato 06’28
15. Adagio tenero 05’19
16. Allegro 03’25

Total time: 15’12

Total running time: 76’11

We have come to the end of another Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf. We began our program with a telephone conversation with Professor Richard Brooks, who will deliver a lecture at the Andes Round Table this Wednesday, March 23, 2005, at the Hunting Tavern in Andes at 7:00PM. Professor Brooks’ topic will be his recent opera Robert and Hal, a work about a man’s coming to terms with his homosexuality. We have also heard Franghiz Ali-Zadeh’s Apsheron Quintet; Quincy Porter’s Second Sonata for Violin and Piano; Paul Hindemith’s Little Chamber Music for 5 Wind Instruments; Erik Satie’s Sports et Divertissements; and Halsey Stevens’s Sonata for Trumpet and Piano. I sincerely hope that you have enjoyed both the interview and our selections today and that you will tune in next week, when we will interview composer/pianist/organist Lucas Weathersby and Italian composer Alberto Patron. We will have both gentlemen on the phone, one in Italy, one in New Orleans. Do you doubt my ability to handle this technology! Oh, ye of little faith. Tune in next week and find out! Until then, this is Gandalf thanking you for listening and wishing you all the joy of New Music!
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