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Posted on Sunday, November 28, 2004

29 November 2004, Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, Monday, Noon to 2:00PM, Streaming on line @ www.wjffradio.org
Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf
Monday, 29 November 04
041129
Good Afternoon, Lovers of Fine Music, and welcome to Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, where we will hear the best of 20th and 21st century classical music as well as interviews with occasional guests. Before we begin our program, let’s hear what Liberty Green has to tell us on her weekly Arts and Culture Calendar.
As always, Liberty, we all thank you for the time and effort you have put into producing the WJFF Arts and Culture calendar.
I had truly hoped to finish editing my interview with Beth Anderson in time to air it today; however, more immediate editing projects intervened, and now I am aiming for next week.
CD 1: Band 4: Isang Yun http://www.classical-composers.org/cgi-bin/ccd.cgi?comp=yun (1917, Tongyon, Korea [now Chungmu] – 1995, Berlin): Concertino for Accordion and String Quartet (1883): Nomos Quartet: Martin Dehning and Sonja-Maria Markis, violins; Friederike Koch, viola; Sabine Pfeiffer, ‘cello; Mie Miki, accordion: CPO 999 075-2.
Last week, we began our program with Isang Yun’s Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet. Today, let’s hear another of Yun’s magnificent quintets, this one for accordion and string quartet. Not many composers have written for this particular combination, and this 1983 chamber piece marks Yun’s first composition for accordion. Walter-Wolfgang Sparrer, translated by Susan Marie Praeder, quotes "Yun’s publisher and friend Harold Kunz" in his liner notes as follows: "[. . . the accordion is] employed in a manner reminiscent of the East Asian mouth organ [which] originated in classical China and was known . . . in Korea as saenghwang . . . [to which the accordion is related]. Isang Yun treats the accordion primarily in chordal fashion . . ." that is, the number of pitches in each chord remains fairly constant. "The strings supplement the actions of the accordion mostly in a complementary way." Yun dedicated the Concertino "to Hugo Noth and to the premiere performers, the Joachim Quartet." (Liner Notes). Once again, in my opinion, Yun integrates the string quartet with the non-stringed instrument, the accordion in this case, seamlessly.
Time: Band 4: Concertino 16’57
CD 2: Bands 26-31: Folk Songs from England, Kentucky, Tyrol, and Tuscany: "O waly, waly" (England), "The Deaf Woman’s Courtship" (Kentucky), "Brother Greene" (Kentucky), "Zu dir" (Tyrol), "Batti, batti" (Tuscany), and "Chi ti ci fa venir" (Tuscany): Samuel Barber, http://www.schirmer.com/composers/barber_bio.html baritone, accompanying himself at the piano. Broadcast from the Curtis Institute of Music, December 26, 1938. Leontyne Price & Samuel Barber – Historic Performances 1938 & 1953. www.BridgeRecords.com Bridge 9156.
Many of us perhaps think of our next performer exclusively as a composer, but these 1938 recordings of six folk songs will come as no surprise to those listeners who are familiar with the baritone voice that sings them or the pianist who plays them - both, of course, the same person. Thanks to our friends at Bridge Records, who have published this Volume 19 of "Great Performances from the Library of Congress we are able to hear our mystery singer/pianist perform several folk songs that might otherwise have escaped our notice! See if you can identify the voice before the baritone completes this delightful performance.
Time: 26. O waly, waly (England) 02’51
27. The Deaf Woman’s Courtship (Kentucky) 01’28
28. Brother Greene (Kentucky) 03’47
29. Zu dir (Tyrol) 02’12
30. Batti, batti (Tuscany) 01’13
31. Chi ti ci fa venir (Tuscany) 01’09
Total time: 12’40
Well, did you recognize the voice of Samuel Barber? He studied voice, as well as composition and piano, at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, entering the school when he was but 14.
Running time: 29’37
CD 3: Bands 2-6: Olivier Messiaen http://stevenestrella.com/composers/index.html?composerfiles/messiaen1992.html (1908, Avignon – 1992, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine): Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum (1964). Yvonne Loriod, piano; Instrumental Percussion Group of the Strasbourg Orchestra of the Musical Domain (Groupe Instrumental à Percussion de Strasbourg Orchestre du Domaine Musical), Pierre Boulez http://www.karadar.net/Dictionary/boulez.html,
conductor. Erato 4509-91706-2.
Our next selection, Olivier Messiaen’s Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum "And I await the raising of the dead") was commissioned in 1964 by André Malraux, according to the liner notes, and "is intended for large spaces, such as churches, cathedrals, the open air, or even a mountainous setting. Just why will become clear as soon as we broadcast it.
Pierre Boulez, who conducts this masterpiece, recalls his experiences as a student in Messiaen’s harmony class (later dropped by the Conservatoire): "It was a time of exploration and liberation, an oasis of simplicity in the surrounding desert of contrivance and fabrication. Names that were all but forbidden, and works of which we knew nothing, were held up for our admiration and were to arouse our intellectual curiosity – names that have since made quite a stir in the world. . . .It is interesting [in retrospect] to observe the fidelity of Messiaen’s pupils to their master, something unusual enough to be emphasized. I have not personally any great faith in the virtues of teaching above a certain level, and yet I cannot fail to recognize that Messiaen was the determining influence of my student days." (Pierre Boulez, Orientations, Trans;. By Martin Cooper. Faber and Faber Limited, 3 Queen Square London WCIN 3AU, 1990. 404-5.) Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum comprises five movements which refer to passages from Psalms, St. Paul’s Epistle to the Romans, The Gospel According to St. John, Corinthians, the Book of Job, and the Apocalypse of John.
Time: 2. Des profondeurs d l’abîme 03’41
3. Le Christ, ressucité des morts 05’24
4. L’heure vient où les morts entendront la voix 04’58
5. Ils ressusciteront, glorieux 08’40
6. Et j’entendis la voix d’une foule immense 06’40
Total time: 30’05
Running time: 59’42
CD 4: Bands 31-36: Karol Szymanowski http://www.szymanowski.info/ (1882, Timoshovka, Ukraine – 1937, Lausanne): Lieder des verliebten Muezzins Op. 42 (1918). Jarosłav Iwaszkiewicz, poet; Claudia Barainsky, soprano; Alex Bauni, piano. Lieder Orfeo C 480 981 A.
In this early 20th century song cycle, the great Polish composer, Karol Szymanowski, "pays magnificent tribute to Islamic culture." In her excellent liner notes, Teresa Chylinska (adapted translation by Lionel Salter) points out that unlike Bartók, Szymanowski did not engage in any "ethnographic study of Arab music, nor did attempt, as a rule, to adopt authentic melodies and rhythms. . . . So one should . . . speak . . . of his intuitive orientalisation of music that was nevertheless always composed in Western fashion. . . . Nevertheless, in the field of Szymanowski’s vocal music these songs are his most exotic compositions. [The poet] Iwaszkiewicz’s invented, ‘artificial’ text left room for the free play of the composer’s imagination." (Liner Notes). Remember that towards the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20 centuries, European composers were frequently experimenting with Asiatic themes without actually attempting to impose real Asiatic sensibilities on their creations. In fact, you will have noticed that I have substituted the term "Asiatic" for the term the European composers would have used back when, a term that is no longer politically correct.
Time: 31. Allah Akbar 02’36
32. O Vielgeliebte (O Much Beloved) 01’47
33. Früher Morgenstrahl erhellt das Minarett 02’59
34. In Mittagsglut erglänzen heisse Mauern 01’53
35. Friedvolle Stunde hält die stadt in Schlaf 03’21
36. Vorbei, o vorüber für ewig! 03’12
Total time: 15’59
Running time: 75’31
CD 5: Band 1: Miguel del Aguila http://members.aol.com/Mdaguila/index.html
(*1957, Montevideo, Uruguay): Sommergesang (Summer Song) (1988): Mark Weiger, oboe; Robert Conway, piano. Oboe on the Road www.centaurrecords.com CRC 2451.
Our next piece was written by a native of Montevideo, Peru, Miguel del Aguila, who emigrated to the United States in 1978, when he was 21, and earned a BA from the San Francisco Conservatory. He moved to Vienna, where he studied for 10 years, returning to the U.S.A to teach and write music. His 1988 chamber piece for oboe and piano, Sommergesang, "was written . . . in a quasi-Rhumba style and is based on his personal experiences with the ever-changing and sometimes devastating elements of mother nature" according to oboist Mark Wieger’s liner notes.
Time: 1. Sommergesang 13’01
Running time: 88’32
CD 6: Band 7: George Walker http://www.uni.edu/taylord/walker.bio.html
(*1922, Washington, DC): Antifonys for chamber Orchestra (1968): The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Paul Freeman, conductor. George Walker – A Portrait Troy 136.
Let’s complete today’s program with a short, but wonderful orchestral piece by George Walker, a composer I had the privilege and pleasure of interviewing a year or so ago. Professor Emeritus at Rutgers University, Professor Walker, in 1956, was the first Black recipient of the Doctor of Musical Arts Degree from the Eastman School). He composed Antifonys for Chamber Orchestra in 1968. The composer writes, "After a short introduction, . . . [f]ragments of melody are tossed around. Kaleidoscopic harmonic patterns alternate or are combined with pulsating rhythms. Climax follows climax until the movement subsides with a string glissando." (Liner Notes). Walker’s music is lyrical, yet sharply focused, often incorporating various 20th century modes while always creating his own distinctive voice.
Time: 17. Antifonys for Chamber Orchestra 06’15
Total running time: 94’47

We have come to the end of another Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf. Today we have heard Isang Yun’s Concertino for Accordion and Strings; Samuel Barber singing six folk songs; Olivier Messiaen’s Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum; Karol Szymanowski’s Lieder des verliebten Muezzins; Miguel del Aguila’s Sommergesang; and George Walker’s Antifonys for Chamber Music. Isn’t 20th and 21st century "classical" music just wonderful? I sincerely hope that you have enjoyed today’s program and that you will tune in next week when, I hope, I will finally have edited my interview with Beth Anderson. Until then, this is Gandalf thanking you for listening and wishing you all the best of New Music!







:: :: ::
22 November 2004, Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, Monday, Noon to 2:00PM, Streaming on line @www.wjffradio.org
Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf
Monday, 22 November 04
041122
Good Afternoon, Lovers of Fine Music, and welcome to Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, where we will hear the best of 20th and 21st century classical music as well as interviews with occasional guests. Before we begin our program, let’s hear what Liberty Green has to tell us on her weekly Arts and Culture Calendar.
As always, Liberty, we all thank you for the time and effort you have put into producing the WJFF Arts and Culture calendar.
Saturday night, I had the exquisite pleasure of hearing Allen Yueh perform the Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37, with the Plainfield Symphony in Plainfield, NJ. Allen, you may recall, was our guest last summer just before he gave an astonishing performance at Shandalee. Needless to say, the audience at the Plainfield Presbyterian Church rewarded the 13 year old soloist, from Bridgewater, NJ, with a standing ovation and many deserved bravos. I felt specially privileged to have been able to attend the concert, and I admit that the tears flowed freely down my cheeks as I listened to Allen perform the Beethoven and two superb encores, Schumann’s ABEGG Variations and the Chopin Nocturne in C# Minor, Op. Posthumous. The Plainfield Symphony celebrates its 85th anniversary on January 16th, by the way! Under the direction and baton of Sabin Pautza, it deserves to be heard! If you have a chance to do so, I definitely recommend it!. www.plainfieldsymphony.org For more information, you can reach them at 1-908-561-5140.
I have long thought that today, November 22, is the saddest day in my calendar. 41 years ago, President Kennedy was assassinated. Anyone over the age of 45 probably remembers what s/he was doing when the news came over the airwaves. JFK would have been 88 years old next May 29th. Imagine!
I dedicate this program to the hope, the verve, the vigor, and optimism that President Kennedy brought to many of us during his short tenure. He wasn’t perfect, but he made me feel alive, human: happy to be an American, hopeful of a bright future.
I also dedicate it to Allen Yueh, who reminds me dramatically and vigorously that the spirit of JFK is still alive and kicking; that if 13 year olds like Allen can focus their talents and energies on performances such as the one I attended on Saturday, there is yet hope for the human race. So here’s to JFK and to Allen Yueh! Long may their spirits reign!
CD 1: Band 1: Isang Yun http://www.classical-composers.org/cgi-bin/ccd.cgi?comp=yun (1917, Tongyong [Chungmu] South Korea – 1995, Berlin): Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet No. 2 (1994). Seiki Shinohne, clarinet; Sawa Quartet: Kazuki Sawa and Hiroaki Oseki, violins; Toshihiko Ichitsubo, viola; Toshiaki Hayashi, ‘cello. Last Works of Isang Yun, Camarata 30CM-363.
I admit that I have become enraptured by Isang Yun’s compositions; I wish I had been able to interview him while he was still alive, but unfortunately I had not yet begun to broadcast when he died. By now, many of our listeners probably know that during the Second World War, Yun was captured and interred by the Japanese. He emigrated to Europe in 1956 and eventually took up residence, in 1964, in Berlin. He made a trip to North Korea in 1963 and, because of his political involvement in the Korean situation, he was kidnapped by the South Korean Secret Police in 1967 and taken to Seoul, where he and his wife were imprisoned. It took two years of international pressure by many of the most influential musicians of the day to gain his release, whereupon he returned to West Germany and eventually became a German citizen.
I find him to be extraordinary in every way: his music is absolutely approachable; it makes demands on the listener’s intellect that can be met; and it appeals to the listener’s emotional make up. More and more, I intend o explore this composer who deserves our attention, in my opinion. Yun’s music, writes Torsten Hass on the webpage cited above, "is dodecaphonic . . . and serial, mixed with traditions of Chinese-Korean music. it’s influenced by taosim . . . and [composed] in categories like Yin and Yang." Yun wrote his Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet No. 1 in 1984. According to Walter-Wofgang Sparrer’s liner notes, his earlier effort is more lyrical than the one we will hear in a moment, but this piece, I think, demonstrates both a great deal of liveliness and energy, as Sparrer notes, without sacrificing a certain lyrical quality that sometimes borders on the neo-Romantic and a lushness that belies those who argue that this kind of music cannot relate to the emotional sensibilities of the listener. Furthermore, the blending of the clarinet and the string quartet is so refined and so well constructed that one wonders why the clarinet isn’t a mandatory instrument in string pieces. I am in the process of trying to get hold of as many of Yun’s works as I can find, because I am anxious to share with you the music of an outstanding late 20th century composer who is simply not as well known as he deserves to be.
Time: 1. Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet No. 2 21’28
CD 2: Bands 1-6: John Harbison http://www.schirmer.com/composers/harbison_bio.html (*1938, Orange, NJ): Mirabai Songs (1982), Transl. by Robert Bly: Georgine Resick, soprano; Warren Jones, piano. Men’s Songs, Women’s Voices, Bridge 9152 www.BridgeRecords.com.
John Harbison composed Mirabai Songs in 1982 for soprano and piano; he later (1984) rescored them for soprano and chamber ensemble. Thanks to our friends at Bridge Records, I’m able to broadcast these exquisite pieces which were translated from one of the languages spoken on the Indian sub-continent by the inimitable Robert Bly, whom I had the great good fortune to interview last summer for Making Waves. Here are Susan Youens brief, but informative, liner notes: "The poet of John Harbison’s Mirabai Songs was a sixteenth-century Indian woman whose husband was killed in war. The Twenty-seven year-old Mirabai refused to commit suttee, to die on her husband’s funeral pyre, as custom mandated; instead, she left the security of her family compound and became a street poet, singing and dancing her mystic love-poems to Krishna, the Dark One. ‘My eyes have their own life,’ she sang, proudly claiming an existence devoted to the erotically-rapturous [sic] spirituality from which she spun these poems." I am not familiar with the soprano, Georgine Resick, but in addition to possessing a very pleasant, controlled voice, her diction is clear and understandable.
Time: 1. It’s True, I Went to the Market 02’58
2. All I Was Doing Was Breathing 02’46
3. Why Mira Can’t Go Back to Her Old House 01’56
4. Where Did You Go? 02’33
5. The Clouds 03’16
6. Don’t Go, Don’t Go 04’30
Total time: 18’18
Running time: 39’46
CD 3: Bands 1,2,3: Terry Riley http://www.terryriley.com/ (*1935, Colfax, CA): Requiem for Adam (1998). http://www.andante.com/article/article.cfm?id=17418: Kronos Quartet www.kronosquartet.org David Harrington and John Sherba, violins; Hank Dutt, viola; Jennifer culp, ‘cello. Nonesuch 79639-2 www.nonesuch.com.
I mentioned at the beginning of the program that I was dedicating today’s show to the memory of JFK and to the incredible energy and sense of purpose he brought to many of us when we were young. Terry Riley’s Requiem for Adam, which he wrote in memory of David Harrington’s son, who died suddenly when he was only 16, seems to me an appropriate piece to play at this point. Although I aired this in June, I make no apology for doing so again. It is, as far as I am concerned, one of the finest pieces of its genre ever composed. Here’s to you, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, and to you, Adam Harrington, and to you, Matthew Shepherd, and to all those who were cut down betimes in the primes of their lives.
Time: 1. Ascending the Heaven Ladder 13’24
2. Cortejo Fúnebre en el Monte Diablo 07’05
3. Requiem for Adam 21’18
Total time: 41’49
Running time: 81’35
CD4: Bands 2-14: John Zorn http://members.tripod.com/~JFGraves/zorn-index.html (*1953, NY): The Dead Man (1990): The Zorn Quartet: Joyce Hammann and Mark Feldman, violins; Lois Martin, viola; Erik Friedlander, ‘cello. The String Quartets TZADIK TZ 7047.
Let’s finish today’s program with a piece written in 13 miniatures by John Zorn, whom we have not featured for too long, called The Dead Man. The liner notes tell us this: The Dead Man has rarely been performed in its complete form and the recording here is of course from the definitive edition, revised several times in the years following is original composition in 1990. This set of 13 miniatures, inspired by the work of the same name by French philosopher/Surrealist George Bataille (and of course Webern’s Bagatelles) contains perhaps the most overt s/m subtexts in all my work. Composed in the same year as Torture Gardens, [sic] I have always imagined these two suites as soundtracks to necessarily short s/m scenes, performed at the at the Vault, Hellfire, a private ‘black party,’ in someone’s personal dungeon or as an underground happening in some dark basement in Tokyo or the East Village.’" Make of those liner notes by Zorn what you will. For all the bravado they betray, the 13 miniatures are named: Variations, Sonatas, Manifesto, Fanfare, Meditation, Rondo, Romance, Blossoms, Fantasy, Folio, Nocturne, Etude, and Prelude. They do, methinks, accurately reflect the world as I perceive it today.

Time: 2. Variations 01’04
3. Sonatas 00’41
4. Manifesto 00’49
5. Fanfare 00’56
6. Meditation 00’53
7. Rondo 00’48
8. Romance 00’30
9. Blossoms 01’07
10. Fantasy 00’52
11. Folio 01’15
12. Nocturne 01’38
13. Etude 00’40
14. Prelude 01’08
Total time: 12’29
Total running time: 94’04
We have come to the end of another Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf. Today’s program, dedicated to the memory of President Kennedy and the the future of Allen Yueh, , featured Isang Yun’s Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet No. 2; John Harbison’s Mirabai Songs; Terry Riley’s Requiem for Adam; and John Zorn’s The Dead Man. I sincerely hope that you have enjoyed today’s selections and that you will tune in next week when I hope to broadcast a recently taped interview with composer Beth Anderson. Until then, this is Gandalf thanking you for listening and wishing you all the joy of new music.







:: :: ::
29 November 2004, Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, Monday, Noon to 2:00PM, Streaming on line @ www.wfjjradio.org
Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf
Monday, 22 November 04
041122
Good Afternoon, Lovers of Fine Music, and welcome to Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, where we will hear the best of 20th and 21st century classical music as well as interviews with occasional guests. Before we begin our program, let’s hear what Liberty Green has to tell us on her weekly Arts and Culture Calendar.
As always, Liberty, we all thank you for the time and effort you have put into producing the WJFF Arts and Culture calendar.
Saturday night, I had the exquisite pleasure of hearing Allen Yueh perform the Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37, with the Plainfield Symphony in Plainfield, NJ. Allen, you may recall, was our guest last summer just before he gave an astonishing performance at Shandalee. Needless to say, the audience at the Plainfield Presbyterian Church rewarded the 13 year old soloist, from Bridgewater, NJ, with a standing ovation and many deserved bravos. I felt specially privileged to have been able to attend the concert, and I admit that the tears flowed freely down my cheeks as I listened to Allen perform the Beethoven and two superb encores, Schumann’s ABEGG Variations and the Chopin Nocturne in C# Minor, Op. Posthumous. The Plainfield Symphony celebrates its 85th anniversary on January 16th, by the way! Under the direction and baton of Sabin Pautza, it deserves to be heard! If you have a chance to do so, I definitely recommend it!. www.plainfieldsymphony.org For more information, you can reach them at 1-908-561-5140.
I have long thought that today, November 22, is the saddest day in my calendar. 41 years ago, President Kennedy was assassinated. Anyone over the age of 45 probably remembers what s/he was doing when the news came over the airwaves. JFK would have been 88 years old next May 29th. Imagine!
I dedicate this program to the hope, the verve, the vigor, and optimism that President Kennedy brought to many of us during his short tenure. He wasn’t perfect, but he made me feel alive, human: happy to be an American, hopeful of a bright future.
I also dedicate it to Allen Yueh, who reminds me dramatically and vigorously that the spirit of JFK is still alive and kicking; that if 13 year olds like Allen can focus their talents and energies on performances such as the one I attended on Saturday, there is yet hope for the human race. So here’s to JFK and to Allen Yueh! Long may their spirits reign!
CD 1: Band 1: Isang Yun http://www.classical-composers.org/cgi-bin/ccd.cgi?comp=yun (1917, Tongyong [Chungmu] South Korea – 1995, Berlin): Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet No. 2 (1994). Seiki Shinohne, clarinet; Sawa Quartet: Kazuki Sawa and Hiroaki Oseki, violins; Toshihiko Ichitsubo, viola; Toshiaki Hayashi, ‘cello. Last Works of Isang Yun, Camarata 30CM-363.
I admit that I have become enraptured by Isang Yun’s compositions; I wish I had been able to interview him while he was still alive, but unfortunately I had not yet begun to broadcast when he died. By now, many of our listeners probably know that during the Second World War, Yun was captured and interred by the Japanese. He emigrated to Europe in 1956 and eventually took up residence, in 1964, in Berlin. He made a trip to North Korea in 1963 and, because of his political involvement in the Korean situation, he was kidnapped by the South Korean Secret Police in 1967 and taken to Seoul, where he and his wife were imprisoned. It took two years of international pressure by many of the most influential musicians of the day to gain his release, whereupon he returned to West Germany and eventually became a German citizen.
I find him to be extraordinary in every way: his music is absolutely approachable; it makes demands on the listener’s intellect that can be met; and it appeals to the listener’s emotional make up. More and more, I intend o explore this composer who deserves our attention, in my opinion. Yun’s music, writes Torsten Hass on the webpage cited above, "is dodecaphonic . . . and serial, mixed with traditions of Chinese-Korean music. it’s influenced by taosim . . . and [composed] in categories like Yin and Yang." Yun wrote his Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet No. 1 in 1984. According to Walter-Wofgang Sparrer’s liner notes, his earlier effort is more lyrical than the one we will hear in a moment, but this piece, I think, demonstrates both a great deal of liveliness and energy, as Sparrer notes, without sacrificing a certain lyrical quality that sometimes borders on the neo-Romantic and a lushness that belies those who argue that this kind of music cannot relate to the emotional sensibilities of the listener. Furthermore, the blending of the clarinet and the string quartet is so refined and so well constructed that one wonders why the clarinet isn’t a mandatory instrument in string pieces. I am in the process of trying to get hold of as many of Yun’s works as I can find, because I am anxious to share with you the music of an outstanding late 20th century composer who is simply not as well known as he deserves to be.
Time: 1. Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet No. 2 21’28
CD 2: Bands 1-6: John Harbison http://www.schirmer.com/composers/harbison_bio.html (*1938, Orange, NJ): Mirabai Songs (1982), Transl. by Robert Bly: Georgine Resick, soprano; Warren Jones, piano. Men’s Songs, Women’s Voices, Bridge 9152 www.BridgeRecords.com.
John Harbison composed Mirabai Songs in 1982 for soprano and piano; he later (1984) rescored them for soprano and chamber ensemble. Thanks to our friends at Bridge Records, I’m able to broadcast these exquisite pieces which were translated from one of the languages spoken on the Indian sub-continent by the inimitable Robert Bly, whom I had the great good fortune to interview last summer for Making Waves. Here are Susan Youens brief, but informative, liner notes: "The poet of John Harbison’s Mirabai Songs was a sixteenth-century Indian woman whose husband was killed in war. The Twenty-seven year-old Mirabai refused to commit suttee, to die on her husband’s funeral pyre, as custom mandated; instead, she left the security of her family compound and became a street poet, singing and dancing her mystic love-poems to Krishna, the Dark One. ‘My eyes have their own life,’ she sang, proudly claiming an existence devoted to the erotically-rapturous [sic] spirituality from which she spun these poems." I am not familiar with the soprano, Georgine Resick, but in addition to possessing a very pleasant, controlled voice, her diction is clear and understandable.
Time: 1. It’s True, I Went to the Market 02’58
2. All I Was Doing Was Breathing 02’46
3. Why Mira Can’t Go Back to Her Old House 01’56
4. Where Did You Go? 02’33
5. The Clouds 03’16
6. Don’t Go, Don’t Go 04’30
Total time: 18’18
Running time: 39’46
CD 3: Bands 1,2,3: Terry Riley http://www.terryriley.com/ (*1935, Colfax, CA): Requiem for Adam (1998). http://www.andante.com/article/article.cfm?id=17418: Kronos Quartet www.kronosquartet.org David Harrington and John Sherba, violins; Hank Dutt, viola; Jennifer culp, ‘cello. Nonesuch 79639-2 www.nonesuch.com.
I mentioned at the beginning of the program that I was dedicating today’s show to the memory of JFK and to the incredible energy and sense of purpose he brought to many of us when we were young. Terry Riley’s Requiem for Adam, which he wrote in memory of David Harrington’s son, who died suddenly when he was only 16, seems to me an appropriate piece to play at this point. Although I aired this in June, I make no apology for doing so again. It is, as far as I am concerned, one of the finest pieces of its genre ever composed. Here’s to you, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, and to you, Adam Harrington, and to you, Matthew Shepherd, and to all those who were cut down betimes in the primes of their lives.
Time: 1. Ascending the Heaven Ladder 13’24
2. Cortejo Fúnebre en el Monte Diablo 07’05
3. Requiem for Adam 21’18
Total time: 41’49
Running time: 81’35
CD4: Bands 2-14: John Zorn http://members.tripod.com/~JFGraves/zorn-index.html (*1953, NY): The Dead Man (1990): The Zorn Quartet: Joyce Hammann and Mark Feldman, violins; Lois Martin, viola; Erik Friedlander, ‘cello. The String Quartets TZADIK TZ 7047.
Let’s finish today’s program with a piece written in 13 miniatures by John Zorn, whom we have not featured for too long, called The Dead Man. The liner notes tell us this: The Dead Man has rarely been performed in its complete form and the recording here is of course from the definitive edition, revised several times in the years following is original composition in 1990. This set of 13 miniatures, inspired by the work of the same name by French philosopher/Surrealist George Bataille (and of course Webern’s Bagatelles) contains perhaps the most overt s/m subtexts in all my work. Composed in the same year as Torture Gardens, [sic] I have always imagined these two suites as soundtracks to necessarily short s/m scenes, performed at the at the Vault, Hellfire, a private ‘black party,’ in someone’s personal dungeon or as an underground happening in some dark basement in Tokyo or the East Village.’" Make of those liner notes by Zorn what you will. For all the bravado they betray, the 13 miniatures are named: Variations, Sonatas, Manifesto, Fanfare, Meditation, Rondo, Romance, Blossoms, Fantasy, Folio, Nocturne, Etude, and Prelude. They do, methinks, accurately reflect the world as I perceive it today.

Time: 2. Variations 01’04
3. Sonatas 00’41
4. Manifesto 00’49
5. Fanfare 00’56
6. Meditation 00’53
7. Rondo 00’48
8. Romance 00’30
9. Blossoms 01’07
10. Fantasy 00’52
11. Folio 01’15
12. Nocturne 01’38
13. Etude 00’40
14. Prelude 01’08
Total time: 12’29
Total running time: 94’04
We have come to the end of another Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf. Today’s program, dedicated to the memory of President Kennedy and the the future of Allen Yueh, , featured Isang Yun’s Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet No. 2; John Harbison’s Mirabai Songs; Terry Riley’s Requiem for Adam; and John Zorn’s The Dead Man. I sincerely hope that you have enjoyed today’s selections and that you will tune in next week when I hope to broadcast a recently taped interview with composer Beth Anderson. Until then, this is Gandalf thanking you for listening and wishing you all the joy of new music.







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Posted on Sunday, November 14, 2004

15 November 2004, Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, Monday, Noon to 2:00PM, Streaming online @ www.wjffradio.com
Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf (Lacks links!)
Monday, 15 November 04
041115
Good Afternoon, Lovers of Fine Music, and welcome to Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, where we will hear the best of 20th and 21st century classical music as well as interviews with occasional guests. Before we begin our program, let’s hear what Liberty Green has to tell us on her weekly Arts and Culture Calendar.
As always, Liberty, we all thank you for the time and effort you have put into producing the WJFF Arts and Culture calendar.
CD1: Bands 1-4: Béla Bartók (1881, Nagyszentmiklós – 1945, NY): Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta (1936). Orchestre de chambre Ferenc Liszt, János Rolla, conductor. Béla Bartók: Musique pour cordes, etc. Harmonia Mundi 1903052.
In his useful compendium The Bartók Companion, Malcolm Gillies, the editor, wrote, in a chapter devoted to the first work we’ll hear today, "A peculiar inspiration seized Bartók during the summer of 1936. Between sessions of learning Turkish, in preparation for a folk-music expedition later in the year, he drafted one of his greatest compositions, the Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta. This work’s concept appears to have been complete in his mind almost at the outset, both in its structure and scoring, for he uncharacteristically wrote it down immediately in full score [creating] one of Bartók’s few compositions to show great originality at all levels of its construction and to integrate seamlessly the full range of his styles, whether drawn more from folk- or art-music sources. It is also Bartók’s most cunning synthesis of opposites, of which the most crucial is chromatic versus diatonic. (The Bartók companion, ed. By Malcolm Gillies. Amadeus Press, Portland, OR, 1993 (303). Whether or not Mr. Gillies is correct in his assessment must be decided by listeners who are more knowledgeable than I am. Nevertheless, I confess that I am a great fan of this composition, which I last broadcast almost exactly three years ago, proof that far from being a century whose music is hardly worth paying attention to, the last 100 or so years provided us with so much great music that it is almost impossible to play any of it more than once in a blue moon! Let’s listen to Bartók’s Musique pour cordes, percussions et célesta performed by the Orchestre de Chambre Ferenc Liszt under the baton of János Rolla.
Time: 1. Andante Tranquillo 06’44
2. Allegro 07’27
3. Adagio 07’28
4. Allegro molto 06’17
Total time: 26’56
We have just heard Béla Bartók’s Musique pour cordes, percussions et célesta performed on a Harmonia Mundi CD by the Orchestre de chambre Ferenc Liszt under the baton of János Rolla.
CD 2: Bands 4-7: Eduard Tubin (1905, Kallaste, Estonia – 1982, Stockholm): Symphony No 8 (1966). The Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järmi, conductor. BIS CD 342.
One of the mid-20th century composers who deserves a great deal more attention than he seems to get is Estonian born, Swedish composer Eduard Tubin. I have broadcast his music from time to time, but never often enough. I have searched my considerable library for entries that might shed some light on this fine composer, who spent the first 39 years of his life in his native Estonia, fleeing to Sweden in 1944 and living out his life there. The closest I’ve been able to get is the entry for "tuba," Perhaps my enthusiasm for Tubin is that of the neophyte who really doesn’t know enough about this art form to make any informed judgments on its composers. I’ll admit that this is more than possible. Nevertheless, Tubin is a composer I return to with some frequency, always discovering something new in his works. Harry Kiisk’s liner notes tell us that Tubin heard a tape recording of his 8th symphony in the hospital just a month before his death in Stockholm. He commented, "The last chorale makes its appearance and then disappears into the distance." We’ll hear The Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra under the baton of conductor Neeme Järvi on this BIS recording.
Time: 4. Andante quasi adagio 07’47
5. Allegro moderato 07’21
6. Allegro vivace 05’39
7. Lento, tenuto e maestoso 07’35
Total time: 28’41
Running time: 55’37
CD 3: Band 2-5: Henryk Górecki (*1933, Czernica, Poland): Quasi una Fantasia - String Quartet No. 2, Op. 64 (1990-1). Kronos Quartet: David Harrington and John Sherba, violins; Hank Dutt, viola; Joan Jeanrenaud, ‘cello. Henryk Górecki Elektra/Nonesuch 9 79319-2.
Norman Lebrecht, no fan of much of 20th century classical music and its operatives, reports with glee in his book Who Killed Classical Music? that Henryk Górecki’s third symphony "topped the classical charts for months and reached number six in the pop album sales, one place behind Paul McCartney, selling six thousand copies a day." Lebrecht’s explanation of this is that in 1976, Górecki "abandoned atonality for the innocent affirmation of spirituality expressed by" that third symphony which, the composer insisted, was not a "religious credo" (Lebrecht’s phrase) but "a love song." (Górecki’s words). Despite Lebrecht’s somewhat disingenuous phrasing, one does not have to eschew Górecki’s atonal days in order to enjoy his tonal music. Today’s piece, his String Quartet No. 2, subtitled Quasi una Fantasia, attests to the composer’s inability to write anything but superb music, I think. Adrian Thomas points out in his liner notes that the piece refers to "Górecki’s heritage in the Polish Catholic church . . . and his rock-like belief in the values of Polish folk culture." Górecki’s Quartet No. 2 is, I think, extremely well performed by the Kronos Quartet, to whom it was dedicated.
Time: 2. Largo sostenuto – mesto 08’07
3. Deciso: Energico: furioso, Tranquillo – mesto 06’45
4. Arioso: Andagio cantabile 07’24
5. Lento-tranquillissimo 09’31
Total time: 31’53
Running time: 87’30
CD 4: Band 3: Christian Wolff (*1934?, Nice): Peruvian Honeymoon (1990). Andrew Rangell, piano. Bridge Records Peruvian Honeymoon. Bridge 9154.
I am not certain whether there are two Christian Wolffs or whether there is simply a disagreement between Andrew Rangell’s liner notes, which give 1932 as Wolff’s birthday, and Baker’s Biographical Dictionary of 20th Century Classical Musicians, which puts it in 1934. No matter. The fun here is in the composition, which Rangell tells us is "sometimes called "Eight Days a Week Variations" [and] which takes an oblique approach to the Beatles’ early tune of that name. The result," continues Rangell, "in this delicately-textured and atonal work, is understated, droll, unpredictable, and beautiful. At the outset, the Beatles’ theme is nowhere in sight. When – after a series of tiny hints – it does appear, it does so in a highly fragmented way. Then, without much ado, it disappears! At the end of the work, two new musics quietly and suddenly appear: a brief melodic fragment with chordal guitar-like accompaniment, and then a series of closely spaced chords creating a kind of tonal haze. In this wonderful whiff of tonality there is a conclusion which brings time to a standstill. In sum, the music seems to go out for a walk, wanders into the theme, sniffs around it briefly, wanders away, and concludes elsewhere (in greener textures.)" [sic] And, no, I am not Bruce Adolph, but see if you can pick out the tune!
Time: 3. Peruvian Honeymoon 04’55
Total running time: 92’25
We have come to the end of another Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf. Today we have heard Bartók’s Music for Strings, Percussions, and Celesta; Eduard Tubin’s Symphony No. 8; Henryk Górecki’s String Quartet No. 2; and Christian Wolff’s Peruvian Holiday. I sincerely hope that you have enjoyed today’s selections and that you will tune in next week for some more great 20th and 21st century classical music and beyond. Until then, this is Gandalf thanking you for listening and wishing you all the joy of New Music!

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Posted on Friday, November 05, 2004

08 November 2004, Monday Afternoon Classics with gandalf, Monday, Noon to 2:00PM, Streaming online @ www.wjffradio.org
Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf
Monday, 25 October 04
041025
Good Afternoon, Lovers of Fine Music, and welcome to Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, where we will hear the best of 20th and 21st century classical music as well as interviews with occasional guests. Before we begin our program, let’s hear what Liberty Green has to tell us on her weekly Arts and Culture Calendar.
As always, Liberty, we all thank you for the time and effort you have put into producing the WJFF Arts and Culture calendar.
Before we begin today’s program, I want to remind our listeners that WJFF is in the 4th day of our annual Fall fund raising drive. In my opinion, the importance of independent, grass roots radio broadcasting has never been more crucial than it is today. Our need to support and promote WJFF is one of the paramount necessities of our listeners. During Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, we have a $250 matching pledge on the table. That means that we need to raise $250 before 2:00PM this afternoon, Our listeners have met this ongoing matching pledge for several years now. I hope that you will find it in your hearts and in your purses and wallets to do so once again.
CD 1: Band 1: Stephan Micus (*1953, Stuttgart) http://www.mybestlife.com/music/Stephan_Micus_Interview.htm: "Earth" from The Garden of Mirrors. Stephan Micus, vocals and Bolombatto. ECM 1632 537 162-2.
It’s been several years since I had the pleasure of interviewing Stephan Micus, a composer who is certainly sui generis, who was born in Stuttgart in 1953, but who left in 1969, traveled, and, eventually, settled in Mallorca. In an unsigned interview that appears on the website linked above, the interviewer writes, "In order to properly enter the musical world of Stephan Micus, you must be a bit like him: curious, very open-minded, very willing to travel, both physically and mentally.." Micus, the interviewer continues, is "a genuine ‘music hermit . . .’ He composes on his own, records on his own, plays on his own, an infinity of instruments," most of which I am familiar with only because of Micus.
I thought it would be appropriate to begin today’s program with a short selection from Stephan Micus’s The Garden of Mirrors, which he composed sometime in the early of mid-90s, for two reasons: First, because it will get our blood flowing and wake up any sleepyheads out there! Second, because it may serve to remind us that there are very few stations in the United States or elsewhere, for that matter, whose listeners permit them to broadcast music of the sort Stephan Micus writes. Our listeners support experimental classical music: all the more reason for all of us to support WJFF both during our fund drives and in between them.
We’ll hear Stephan Micus accompany himself on the bolombatto, a West African harp with four gut strings over a gourd resonator and an attached tin rattle. The rattle is set in motion by the simultaneous striking of the strings and the sound box. In former times, shepherds also used the bolombatto to frighten off wild animals. (Liner notes). The bolombatto is the perfect instrument for our times. Perhaps we should all learn to play it!

Time: 1. Earth 06’24
CD 2: Band 1: Roberto Sierra (*1953, Vega Baja, PI) http://www.robertosierra.com/biography.htm: Toccata y Lamento (1987). Michael Nicolella, www.nicolella.com guitar. On Push, Gale Recordings 009-0002.
A couple of years have passed since we welcomed Roberto Sierra to our program. Roberto, who was born in Vega Baja, Puerto Rico in 1953, has long been internationally recognized as one of the premier composers of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. He is a member of the faculty of Cornell University, where he teaches composition. He wrote Toccata y Lamento in 1987, dedicating it "in memoria de Villa-Lobos, the remarkable Brazilian composer who belongs in anyone’s pantheon of composers. Guitarist Michael Nicollela writes in the liner notes, "[I]n a manner quite reminiscent of the imaginative Brazilian composer, Roberto is able to exploit the guitar’s idiosyncrasies with amazing creativity." I think you will agree that Nicollela does justice to this fine piece. Once again, I remind our listeners that WJFF is in the 4th day of our 2004 Fall fund drive. We need your help now to match a $250 matching pledge. I take no pleasure in pointing out once again that only a station such as WJFF, with the support of its superb listeners and members, is likely to broadcast music written recently by composers as accomplished and satisfying to listen to as Roberto Sierra. I am not selfish: I long for the day when every responsible, respectable radio station will devote time to contemporary classical music! Please call us at 845-482-4141.
Time: 1. Toccota y Lamento 04’29
Running time: 10’53
CD 3: Band 25: George Crumb (*1929, Charleston, WV) www.GeorgeCrumb.net : Otherworldy Resonances for Two Amplified Pianos (premiere recording). Quattro Mani: Susan Grace and Alice Rybak, duo pianists. Bridge Records www.BridgeRecords.com Complete Crumb Edition, Vol. 8. Bridge 9155.
Last February or so, if memory serves me, I had the privilege and pleasure of interviewing George Crumb, by any measure one of the truly great composers of the past 50 or so years. Thanks to Bridge Records, which has set itself the task of recording his complete oeuvre, we are able to revisit George Crumb today and broadcast the premiere recording of his Otherworldly Resonances for Two Amplified Pianos, performed by Susan Grace and Alyce Rybak. Once again, I remind our listeners that we have a matching pledge of $250 on the table which we need to meet by 2:00PM today. You have always been very supportive of this program and all our other programs that are unique to WJFF. Without your enthusiastic support of such programs as Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf, our station would be just another humdrum station on the fm dial with no particular claim to listeners’ attention. We are anything but that, however. At our best, we provide beacons of light, clarion calls to those who appreciate great programming. Please help us continue. Call us at 845-482-4141 and support us with your pledges now!
Time: 25. Otherworldly Resonances 09’41
Running time: 20’34
CD 4: Bands 21-24: Jake Heggie http://www.jakeheggie.com/ (*1961, West Palm Beach, FL): from Songs to the Moon (1998). Frederica von Stade http://www.fredericavonstade.com/ , mezzo-soprano, Jake Heggie, piano. BMG Classics www.bmgclassics.com: The Faces of Love – The Songs of Jake Heggie 09026-63484-2.
Perhaps you remember our interviews with Jake Heggie earlier this year. What a composer! What a sweet human being. We’re going to air four songs by Jake Heggie which he wrote to poems by Vachel Lindsay in 1987. The mezzo soprano who performs these pieces is none other than Jakes’ good friend and frequent collaborator, Frederica von Stade. When you listen to her, you will, I am sure, agree with me that when Von Stade is in voice, which is almost always, no one can compete with her clarity, her interpretive powers, her range of pearl shaped tones. She sings "Once More – To Gloriana"; "Euclid"; "The Haughty Snail King"; "What the gray-Winged Fairy Said." Remember, you have supported both the interviews and the music that Monday Afternoon Classics has been able to bring you over the years. We have a $250 matching pledge that needs to be met by 2:00PM. Please continue your generous support by helping us meet that before the end of our program!
Time: 21. Once More – To Gloriana 02’36
22. Euclid 01’46
23. The Haughty Snail King 03’14
24: What the Gray-Winged Fairy said 01’59
Total time: 09’35
Running time: 30’10

CD 5: Band 5: Tomas Svoboda (b. 1939, Paris) www.TomasSvoboda.com : Phantasy (1984). Lubomír Havlák, violin; Jitka Vlašánková, ‘cello; Tomas Svoboda, piano. Tomos Svoboda – Piano Trios: North Pacific Music NPM LD 008 www.NorthPacificMusic.com .
Another wonderful composer whom I had the privilege of interviewing within the last year is Tomas Svoboda, who was born in Paris in 1939 to Czech parents who had fled the invasion, emigrating to Boston, but returning to Czechoslovakia in 1946. In 1964, the entire family moved to the United States. Eventually, Svoboda settled in Portland, Oregon, where he has continued to compose, conduct, and, in my opinion, grace the modern classical world of music. Our next piece, therefore, is Tomas Svoboda’s 1984 composition, Phantasy, which was commissioned by the Mirecourt Trio. The anonymous liner notes describe Phantasy as a "one movement piece [that] is quite complex in its form and structure. There are two contrasting elements, divided by contrasting tempi and rhythmic drive. The first one, very light, fast, and jazzy reaches the point of an energetic, syncopated scherzo; while the other idea expresses slow, majestic and meditative calming predictable jazz rhythms. After a climax, culminating in a slow, robust piano solo, the coda merges both elements in a peaceful conclusion. The music gradually loses its energy and finally, like a dream, fades into nothingness. Once again I remind our listeners that WJFF is in the 4th day of its annual Fall fund drive. We have a $250 matching pledge that I hope we will be able to meet. If you haven’t yet called us at 845-482-4141, I ask you to consider the worth of a station whose members allow it to broadcast on a weekly basis the classical music of the past 104 years. Not many do!
Time: 5. Phantasy 11’26
Running time: 41’36
CD 6: Bands 1,2,3: Phillip Kent Bimstein http://www.bimstein.com/html/bio/html (*1947, Chicago, IL): Garland Hirschi’s Cows (1990). Starkland CD Phillip Kent Bimstein – Garland Hirschi’s Cows: ST-205.
Surely one of the more colorful composers I’ve been fortunate enough to interview during the past year is Phillip Kent Bimstein, whose unique composition, The Door, provides the intro and outro for Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf. The piece we are about to hear is a favorite of our listeners, at least judging by the phone calls it usually elicits: Garland Hirschi’s Cows, according to Bimstein’s liner notes, came about this way: "I awoke one morning to the sounds of cows mooing in the pasture next to my home (in Bryce Park, Utah). Music tomy ears, the moos became the inspiration for Garland Hirschi’s Cows, a concerto in three ‘moovements." The piece also includes the voice of the cows’ owner, Garland C. Hirschi, who asks, ‘You wanna know a little bit about my cows, huh?’ and then goes on to tell his stories about growing up with cows and what makes them moo." Where else could you hear music like this on your local radio station? If you enjoy the fact that WJFF provides an outlet for a variety of programs that you cannot find anywhere else, I ask you to consider making a pledge to help us towards our $20,000 goal and the $250 matching pledge that we need to meet before 2:00PM this afternoon! 845-482-4141.
Time: 1. A Little Bit About My Cows 02’46
2. Pasturale 04’03
3. Moovement 05’12
Total time: 11’57
Running time: 53’33
CD 7: Band 2: Terry Riley (*1935, Colfax, CA): Negro Hall (1995). Terry Riley, piano. New Albion Records http://www.newalbion.com Lisbon Concert NA 087 CD.
It won’t take most of our listeners long to figure out who the next composer/performer is; I was really fortunate to be able to interview him a year or so ago, and I have never forgotten the incredible sense of humanity, talent, and intelligence that pervaded his comments. Recorded in Lisbon, Portugal on July 16, 1995, "Negro Hall" is the creation of the inimitable and vesatile Terry Riley. Sarah Cahill’s liner notes remind us that "[t]his live recording is a document of the final concert in Riley’s sixtieth birthday European tour." Terry riley writes, "this concert represents about 50 years of thought, practice, composition and improvisation for that marvelous and ever challenging instrument – the Piano." Wouldn’t you like to have been there!!! Perhaps some of you were! I wish I had been. While you’re savoring this piece composed and performed by the master, perhaps you’ll also consider the importance of WJFF in your lives and give us a ring at 845-482-4141. We need your help to make this autumn’s fund drive successful; we need it, also, to help meet the $250 matching pledge that needs to be fulfilled by 2:00PM. How about it! Give us a ring!
Time: 2. Negro Hall 14’40
Running time: 68’10
CD 8: Band 1: David Del Tredici (*1937) http://www.goddard.edu/wgdr/kalvos/deltred.html , Cloverdale, CA): I Hear an Army (1964). Phyllis Bryn-Julson, soprano; Composers Quartet: Matthew Raimondi, Anahid, Ajemian, violins; Jean Dupouy, viola; Michael Rudiakov, ‘cello. Cri 689 (Cri is no longer in business, alas!).
David Del Tredici was one of my early interview victims. Fortunately for me, he proved to be kind, intelligent, well informed, and a delight to talk with. The piece we’ll broadcast next is an early composition by David entitled I Hear an Army, which he wrote in 1964. Robin Holloway writes in the liner notes: "I Hear an Army embeds the vocal part within an almost symphonic structure for string quartet alone. And its techniques and the sound they make are already [authentic] and could not be mistaken for the work of any other composer. The poem is the last in Joyce’s Chamber Music http://www/themodernword.com/joyce/music/del_tredici.html standing out in its sustained surreal violence from that otherwise fragile context." Before I begin this piece, which will probably be the last one on our program today, I respectfully remind our listeners that we are coming close to the time limitation we need to meet in order to receive the $250 matching pledge that was made at the beginning of this program. If you enjoy this music; if you are simply pleased that your station provides a time slot for it, please call us at 845-482-4141 in the next few minutes and make your pledge. If you’ve made a pledge during an earlier drive this year, perhaps you’d consider adding something to it. This is an excellent opportunity to honor a friend or relative; to remember a departed one; to help keep WJFF broadcasting brightly. Thanks in advance!
Time: 1. I Hear an Army 12’28
Running time: 80’38
We have come to the end of another Monday Afternoon Classics with Gandalf. During the 4th day of our 2004 autumn pledge drive, we have heard Earth, by Stephan Micus; Toccata y Lamento, by Roberto Sierra; Otherworldly Resonances, by George Crumb; Four Songs by Jake Heggie; Phantasy, by Tomas Svoboda; Garland Hirschi’s Cows, by Phillip Kent Bimstein; Negro Hall, by Terry Riley; and I Hear an Army, by David Del Tredici. I sincerely hope that you have enjoyed today’s selections and that you will tune in next week for more great 20th and 21st century music. Until then, this is Gandalf thanking you for listening and wishing you all the best of New Music!
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